Sometimes It’s Better Not to Know

I am still loving the process of knitting lace. I still love the product. I thought perhaps I should say this right up front. Actually, it is a very good thing.

Last week after struggling for several hours, I got that first point knitted on the border of my capelet. The next time I sat down with it, the impossible happened. Despite the fact that there was a lifeline, as I finished the second point, the entire edging just fell off in my hand. I’ve gone over it in my head dozens of times, but there is just no explanation. I’m obsessive about my lifelines. That notwithstanding, the reality of the situation was that I had to start over yet again, battling through the hateful first point on the lace. Happily, I survived the ordeal, and so did the capelet, and now I can claim not one, but 12 points worked, starting with the center of the neck, around the corner and down the front, three points per CD of my current audiobook, aptly titled Knitting (by Ann Bartlett).

Capelet with 12 lace points

I’ve become extremely eager to release the undulating bottom edge of this piece from the bonds of the cable needle, which is holding it in an artificially gathered position, and with the next CD, this will begin to happen. Here is also where I made my mistake…

While sitting with it draped over my shoulder, imagining the finished project and fondling the softness of the merino, I chanced to wonder how many nights it would be before I could wear it for real. Okay, this should be some easy math. I have 12 points finished, plus 2 more to reach the corner. Double that to get the other half of the neck and second front edge… 28. Then there are 684 stitches along the bottom edge, and I use 6 for each point, so… OH!!! That’s how many? Surely not! 114 points along the bottom – plus 4 more for working the corners makes 118! Gulp! With the 28, that is 146 points, 134 of which are not done. If I can do 3 each day (an hour’s work), that’s a horrifying 45 days of work ahead of me just to do the border. That’s longer than it’s taken me to do the main body – and it will be well into spring by then. No wonder I still have one skein of the required wool untouched… I’m not afraid of the work, but I’m dreadfully impatient to have the finished project! Why ever did I think I needed to know?

In other news, The World’s Fastest Knitter was just crowned for this year. Her name is Hazel Tindall, she’s from Shetland, and she’s retaining her title from last year. She broke her old record by knitting 262 stitches in the 3 minutes alloted, beating her closest contender by 19 stitches. That’s a sustained rate of 3 stitches every 2 seconds over rows 60 stitches long with a massive crowd and 4 camera crews watching – all in a foreign country.

She wasn’t knitting lace…

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Published in: on February 25, 2008 at 6:40 am  Leave a Comment  
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